Ancient Egyptian Woman with 70 Hair Extensions Discovered »

archaeologicalnews:

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More than 3,300 years ago, in a newly built city in Egypt, a woman with an incredibly elaborate hairstyle of lengthy hair extensions was laid to rest.

She was not mummified, her body simply being wrapped in a mat. When archaeologists uncovered her remains they found she wore “a very complex…

madridgirl7:

Levallois technique, a type of stone knapping developed by precursors to modern humans during the Palaeolithic period.

madridgirl7:

Levallois technique, a type of stone knapping developed by precursors to modern humans during the Palaeolithic period.

fuckyeahforensics:

The growing human skull by Sarah-Jane Smith, Wellcome Collection. Front views of five human skulls showing the changes that occur during development and aging. From left to right: newborn, 5 years, 14 years, adult and elderly.

fuckyeahforensics:

The growing human skull by Sarah-Jane Smith, Wellcome Collection. Front views of five human skulls showing the changes that occur during development and aging. From left to right: newborn, 5 years, 14 years, adult and elderly.

virtual-artifacts:

Tatooed Face; a Thracian Goddess and/or a woman of high status. 380 - 350 BCE. ancient Bulgaria. the Vrasta Greave, silver and gold.

virtual-artifacts:

Tatooed Face; a Thracian Goddess and/or a woman of high status. 380 - 350 BCE. ancient Bulgaria. the Vrasta Greave, silver and gold.

kqedscience:

How Does Evolution Explain Human Cannibalism?
“Most people only resort to cannibalism in extreme situations — and we usually view them as victims of temporary insanity. Starvation, we say, has “stripped them of their humanity.” But a closer look at these stories shows that cannibalism follows behavior patterns that are consistent with evolutionary theory.”
Learn more from io9.

kqedscience:

How Does Evolution Explain Human Cannibalism?

Most people only resort to cannibalism in extreme situations — and we usually view them as victims of temporary insanity. Starvation, we say, has “stripped them of their humanity.” But a closer look at these stories shows that cannibalism follows behavior patterns that are consistent with evolutionary theory.”

Learn more from io9.

earthstory:

Why is obsidian so useful for tools?The ancient inhabitants of many continents knew the properties of obsidian. This black volcanic glass was a key component in tools and hunting weapons; arrowheads and shards from their production are found all over the world and trading paths between different civilizations can even be tracked using obsidian.The reason why this rock was so useful comes fromthe structure of the rock. Obsidian isn’t a mineral, by definition. Minerals have a defined structure that repeats over and over again. Obsidian is what we’d call a “glass”. A mineral growing from lava needs time to grow; atoms need time to move together and form a defined structure. If lava cools off too quickly, it can instead have all its atoms locked into whatever format sat there when the magma was molten, a state we call a glass.A glass has no defined, long-term structure, so it doesn’t break into crystal faces. This property means glasses are strong in all directions and when broken they will have what we call “conchoidal fractures”. This is different from crystals; they tend to break along fracture or “cleavage” plains controlled by the arrangement of the atoms. You can see the remnant of those fractures in the rippled breaks at the edge of this stone tool artifact; the fractures formed at a single point and widened as they broke outwards.A skilled worker using obsidian can create a series of conchoidal fractures around the edge that bring the rock to an extremely sharp point. The angle of the tip won’t be limited by the natural crystal shape; instead the spear tip can be made both strong and sharp.Obsidian is generally made out of high silica, rhyolitic lava. These high silica lavas are very viscous and therefore crystals don’t grow rapidly on them, making obsidian formation easy. Different obsidian compositions and structures do behave differently during processing, so some obsidian sources were highly prized and rocks that match in chemistry were traded across thousands of kilometers, covering entire continents.-JBBImage credit: John Atherton (Creative Commons):https://www.flickr.com/photos/gbaku/1287124990/Read more:http://www.texasbeyondhistory.net/st-plains/prehistory/images/distant.htmlhttp://volcano.oregonstate.edu/obsidianhttp://www.public.asu.edu/~mesmith9/1-CompleteSet/MES-10-TradeEncyc.pdfhttp://www.fieldmuseum.org/node/4766

earthstory:

Why is obsidian so useful for tools?

The ancient inhabitants of many continents knew the properties of obsidian. This black volcanic glass was a key component in tools and hunting weapons; arrowheads and shards from their production are found all over the world and trading paths between different civilizations can even be tracked using obsidian.

The reason why this rock was so useful comes fromthe structure of the rock. Obsidian isn’t a mineral, by definition. Minerals have a defined structure that repeats over and over again. Obsidian is what we’d call a “glass”. A mineral growing from lava needs time to grow; atoms need time to move together and form a defined structure. If lava cools off too quickly, it can instead have all its atoms locked into whatever format sat there when the magma was molten, a state we call a glass.

A glass has no defined, long-term structure, so it doesn’t break into crystal faces. This property means glasses are strong in all directions and when broken they will have what we call “conchoidal fractures”. This is different from crystals; they tend to break along fracture or “cleavage” plains controlled by the arrangement of the atoms. You can see the remnant of those fractures in the rippled breaks at the edge of this stone tool artifact; the fractures formed at a single point and widened as they broke outwards.

A skilled worker using obsidian can create a series of conchoidal fractures around the edge that bring the rock to an extremely sharp point. The angle of the tip won’t be limited by the natural crystal shape; instead the spear tip can be made both strong and sharp.

Obsidian is generally made out of high silica, rhyolitic lava. These high silica lavas are very viscous and therefore crystals don’t grow rapidly on them, making obsidian formation easy. Different obsidian compositions and structures do behave differently during processing, so some obsidian sources were highly prized and rocks that match in chemistry were traded across thousands of kilometers, covering entire continents.

-JBB

Image credit: John Atherton (Creative Commons):https://www.flickr.com/photos/gbaku/1287124990/

Read more:
http://www.texasbeyondhistory.net/st-plains/prehistory/images/distant.html
http://volcano.oregonstate.edu/obsidian
http://www.public.asu.edu/~mesmith9/1-CompleteSet/MES-10-TradeEncyc.pdf
http://www.fieldmuseum.org/node/4766

New Student to Archaeology or Anthropology? »

allthingsaafs:

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If you’re wondering what the best literature and textbooks are for these subjects we have a page full of our suggestions that we’ve gathered for you!

Here are a few of the most useful textbooks to have:

Hey lovely anthro-centrics,

I wanted to compile a list of anthropology tumblrs, so please message me the URL of your tumblr blog and I’ll create a nice clickable list for you all!

The blog itself must be solely dedicated to anthropology, so please don’t be upset with me if I cannot include yours.

Thanks,

Sasha of Anthropologydaily